Fringe Diary #1

Okay so it’s been a while I realise, so let me get you up to speed. I moved to Berlin six months ago this week, and it’s really fun and great apart from the fact that I am homeless and jobless and my hair is now just about long enough to look terrible, always. Mmm.. that’s probably all you need to know at this point. 

Oh but I’m at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival now! That’s why I’m writing this. COOL

cofffeeee
from my Very Good instagram

Scotland makes me think of Germany, and both of them make me think of Canada. Scotland and Germany are the first places I travelled to without my family, alone, because I was interested in them. (That’s not true for Canada, but once I moved to Quebec in a dream and it was great.) They both feel like my places, I have a fondness for them that a fair few, but not all, people do. The Fringe was the first place I went as soon as I turned 18 and I was there for the whole festival just after I graduated, working on some short films and kissing absolutely everyone.

Never would have expected that just four years later, I’d be here performing at shows for the Cambridge Footlights and a Berlin comedy club, as a blonde. Life comes at you fast.

I did my first show with the Free Footlights show last night, which I think is mostly there just to help them promote other shows they have going on. (I may need to invent something sharpish. Comedy show titles aren’t hard. “Josie Parkinson: Bangle Monkey.” There we go.)
Performing for a British audience for the first time since January was always going to be great and strange, but performing for an audience for a Cambridge-educated comedy troupe is a different thing. My set went down all right, but having done that show I’m free to rewrite it all with MAXIMAL ENGLISHNESS. I can make cultural references! I can do super-sophisticated wordplay! I can talk fast and miss out my “t”s! Tha’sm’favri’!

Once I finish this (which I really need to do, soon) I’ll be moving on to working on some new and/or better jokes for tonight, anyway. That’s something I love about stand-up that I didn’t love about film and it’s why I will sometimes, in the dead of night, if I’m feeling very bold, tell people that stand-up is like a language. Because my stand-up right now… is like a GCSE French oral exam: the weekend, I play tennis with my friends. It is fun! What I mean is that although I know I’m not great or remarkable now, it’s so easy to get to practise, and hone, and improve – I feel like there’s a clear trajectory to find a way to get better. Film used to terrify me because there seemed to be so many obstacles to actually getting good at making them, you’d have to get so many people involved, so much money, so much time and at such an expense, just to find out you have a terrible film and need to do better next time. With comedy, I can cock up as many times as I want for free! Quel bonheur!

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